Injustice Against the Sabbath

2 thoughts on “Injustice Against the Sabbath”

  1. Granted, for the sake of argument, that the Sabbath injunction applies to Christians, what are your criteria for determining what “work” is?

  2. I might ask instead what rest is. Whatever rest means, though, it must be more than the mere feeling of being refreshed. ‘We, who mystically represent the cherubim, and chant the thrice-holy hymn to the life-giving Trinity, let us set aside the cares of life, that we may receive the King of all, who comes invisibly escorted by the divine hosts.’ Having heard God’s most holy word and received his sealing gifts, having known in our midst the same Jesus who healed on the Sabbath, we go forth and live and proclaim this rest.

    The weekly Day of Resurrection (the first day of a New Creation) is a day of freedom, of deliverance from darkness, prefigured by the Sabbath healings. What actually does things in the world to loose bondage – physical healing, for instance – might be part of that, so our Sabbath activities might include inviting the poor, the crippled, the lame and the blind to join us for dinner (not that I’ve actually done that before) and enjoying the earth as God delighted in it on the seventh day.

    Keeping the Sabbath, I think, at least implies not working for pay (if Jews can get off for Yom Kippur and their Sabbath, and Muslims can be accommodated for Ramadan, why not Christians for the Sabbath?). It’s a feast day, right? – when no one can fast, just as Jesus’ disciples didn’t fast when he was still with them in the flesh. I guess our workaholic culture still makes many people work on Sundays, and Chinese restaurants are open every day (Christmas and Easter included), but I think generally the keeping of a feast means you don’t do what would be considered work on 25 December.

    I know I don’t have very detailed criteria, but I’m trying to learn about this too. John Montague would know more about Sabbath-keeping in practice.

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